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Your Feedback: Things That Are Wrong With Boston

On Wednesday we batted around a thesis posed by Boston Globe columnist Scott Kirsner, who complained that Boston is forever stuck in second tier status among major American cities.

“There’s a lot of exciting stuff going on here,” Kirsner said, “but we need to focus on the sectors where we can say Massachusetts is a world leader in this industry, and you know that’s what attracts talent to the state, not saying you know, ‘oh yeah, sorta have a financial services community here.'”

Kisner was mostly talking about the technology and entrepreneurship scene in Boston, but our listeners took the second-tier-city concept and ran with it.

So, here now is a partial list of things that are wrong with Boston, according to you.

Fadila Reda: “Although Boston boasts great natural and material gifts, its weakness lies in its lack of a HEART & SOUL.”

Beez: “Just because we have The MFA and BSO doesn’t mean we have culture. […] The entire culture and society of Boston is catered to white anglos, and is very unwelcoming to diverse populations.”

Dave Palmacci: “Boston tries to be this great progressive city but still has this Puritan, old-fashioned conservative leash on itself. Too much regulation, fear of change, and unwillingness to ‘color outside the lines.'”

J_o_h_n: “The rent is too damn high!”

Sirrag: “People would be raving about how amazing Boston is if its cost of living were in line with its reality. Whatever its tier status, Boston has first tier expenses. […] In my mind, cost may be THE thing actually keeping Boston [from] developing the human and material capital it needs.”

As always, keep your feedback coming.


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Host Meghna Chakrabarti introduces us to newsmakers, big thinkers and artists and brings us stories of relevance to Bostonians here and around the region. Live every weekday at 3 p.m. and 10 p.m.

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